Beware Of Banking Scams

Scammers never take a break. They’re always dreaming up ways to con you out of yourImage of man using computer money. Recently, there’s been a significant uptick in scams involving checking accounts at many financial institutions.

In these scams, criminals will utilize social media to connect with the victim.

They usually pose as representatives of a bank or credit union and milk the victim for sensitive information, like account numbers and passwords. Since the scammers are using the credit union’s social media accounts, the victims often won’t hesitate to share this information. When the scammers have what they need, they will proceed to empty the victim’s accounts and then disappear.

Often, when the scammers receive a response from the victim on social media, they will redirect the victim to what appears to be the financial institution’s website. The victim, thinking they are on the site they frequently use, will quickly input their username and ID, which the scammers will then use to empty their accounts or open credit cards in the victim’s name.

Sometimes, the scammers will impersonate helpful member representatives who are seemingly looking to answer your questions. You’re used to our representatives being helpful and always on call to assist you, so you won’t see anything strange with the scenario.

Other times, the scammer may claim your account has been compromised and you need to immediately update your information. They’ll be oh-so-helpful with this step. Until you share your information with them, that is.

Still other times, scammers will pose as representatives of a sweepstakes or some other contest that you’ve “won.” All you need to do is share your account information and your passwords to be made into an instant millionaire! Except that, of course, you won’t.

Don’t be the next victim! Be aware and be alert. Here’s what you need to know about this scam:

1.) Check URLs

Scammers are becoming increasingly more suave at posing as companies their victims are familiar with. You can check a site’s authenticity by double-checking the URL on the web address. Make sure it matches Destinations Credit Union’s site exactly. You can also check a site’s security by looking for the “S” after the “http” on the web address.

2.) Be suspicious

Awareness can be your best protection. It’s easy for a scammer to pose as a member representative on social media, but if you’re on guard, you’ll spot these fakers. Is a representative claiming there are problems with your account when everything seems to be in order? Are they asking you to share sensitive information through insecure channels? Is someone promising you’ve won a contest you’ve never entered? If things don’t add up, it’s best to opt out.

3.) Reach out to your credit union

It may be difficult to determine whether the people you’re talking to are the real thing. If you think you’re dealing with Destinations Credit Union but things suddenly start looking fishy, there’s a simple solution. Hang up or log out of whatever medium you’re engaged in and call Destinations Credit Union yourself. You can always reach out to us at 410-663-2500. This way, you’ll know you’ve really reached us and you’re not being scammed. Be sure to call this number and never use another number suggested by a suspicious-acting “member representative.”

4.) In case of fraud, take action

If you suspect you’ve been taken for a ride, let us know as soon as possible. The sooner you catch a scam, the better off you’ll be. We’ll also be able to alert our other members and work on catching the crooks who’ve conned you.

It’s also a good idea to let the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) know about the scam. The more information you share, the easier it will be for the feds to nail those scumbags. Contact the FTC at FTC.gov.

5.) Protect yourself

It’s a good idea to practice basic safety and protective measures with your accounts.

Here’s how:

  1. Safeguard account details: Never share account information without being certain about who you are talking to.
  2. Use good password hygiene: Use complex passwords and change them often. Be sure to use different passwords for each of your accounts.
  3. Choose extra protection: Opt in for two-factor identification when logging into your accounts. That’s an extra level of protection for you and another hurdle for scammers to scale.
  4. Set up alerts: Choose to receive an email or a text message when transactions on your account exceed your typical level of spending.
  5. Monitor your accounts: It’s a good idea to check your accounts on a regular basis, and with our mobile app, this is now easier than ever. In most cases, you will be responsible for fraudulent charges on your account if you report them more than 60 days after your monthly statement is delivered.

SOURCES:
https://www.google.com/amp/amp.timeinc.net/fortune/2016/11/11/social-media-cyber-scam 

https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/my-money/2015/01/23/5-scams-that-target-your-bank-account 
https://www.cnbc.com/2017/05/12/this-growing-fraud-will-drain-your-bank-account.html 
https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/social-media-phishing-attacks-soar/ 
https://www.advantiscu.org/fraud-prevention/beware-of-phishing-scams-in-social-media.html

The Story Behind the Sonic Breach

It’s been a rough go of things when it comes to the security of debit and credit card as sonicwell as personal information. The massive Equifax breach has already left many Americans feeling unprotected and insecure while Yahoo experienced yet another breach soon afterward. To top it all off, the popular burger chain Sonic Drive-in announced in late September that its payment portals had been compromised.

Experts estimate that information for millions of cards was hacked from the nearly 3,600 Sonic locations across 45 states. The card numbers and details are now up for sale on the darknet.

Here’s what you need to know about the latest in a long line of nationwide security breaches:

What happened?

The breach became a reality when Sonic’s card processing company reported “unusual activity” on a large number of cards that had been recently used at Sonic. Further investigation uncovered a tremendous data breach with the potential to affect millions of consumers.

Sonic utilizes a single point-of-sale system that is deployed at the majority of its locations. Using sophisticated malware, hackers were able to access the system. The malware copied the information on every card that was swiped in the payment terminal, and then sent it back to the hackers.

The hackers then put this information up for sale online, where buyers can use the card details to rack up huge bills, empty accounts or even steal victims’ identities.

While Sonic was quick to share this basic information with the public, it can be months before more details are known and shared with concerned customers.

This breach is similar to the one that hit Wendy’s last year, lasting nine months and affecting 300 restaurants. It took that long to determine the issue and resolve it because many of Wendy’s locations are franchises. Approximately 90% of Sonic’s joints are franchises as well, thus adding to the delay.

Who was affected?

Anyone who’s used a debit or credit card at any of Sonic’s locations during the last year may have been a victim in the breach. It is still unclear exactly how many customers were affected by the breach, though it is estimated that there may be as many as five million victims in this malware attack.

While most cards with compromised info were linked to activity at one of Sonic’s locations, it is possible that other companies’ security systems were also breached.

How did Sonic react to the attack?

Sonic has announced that it will offer all customers 24 months of complimentary fraud protection through Experian’s IdentityWorks program.

Sonic was also quick to hire third-party forensic experts to help investigate the attack and identify the hackers. They have also promised to research ways for improving their current system to better protect customers in the future.

How can you protect yourself from this and all future data breaches?

1.)   Find out if you were affected: If you’re a regular, or even an occasional, Sonic customer, find out if you were affected by the breach. Review your recent account information on all your cards. If you spot suspicious activity, alert your card issuer and place a freeze on your account. You can also place a fraud alert with the credit bureaus. This will warn creditors that you’ve recently been targeted in a hack, alerting them to verify that anyone seeking credit in your name is actually you. Lastly, accept Sonic’s offer of two years of free fraud protection.

2.)   Use fraud protection: Even if you haven’t been affected by this breach, it’s a good idea to sign up for fraud protection. These services don’t usually come free, although, in light of its recent data breach, Equifax is now offering a full year of protection with their TrustedID program, free of charge. Fraud protection services will ease the stress of monitoring your credit for fraudulent activity and unusual behavior.

3.)   Monitor your accounts: It’s always wise to keep a sharp eye on your money – and that means more than just checking that your wallet is safe. Review all checking account activity several times a week to determine whether your account information or debit card has been hacked or stolen. Also, never throw away a credit card statement without carefully reviewing it to be sure every transaction belongs to you. Additionally, it’s wise to shred such paperwork rather than throwing it in the trash. Finally, request a credit report from the three major credit reporting agencies once a year to see if anyone is using your name to rack up a huge bill or take out a generous loan.

4.)   Set up alerts: You can receive notice about suspicious activity almost as soon as they happen by signing up for alerts. Place a maximum transaction amount on your credit and debit card so a thief won’t get away with a huge purchase. You can also limit your transactions to a specific area or region of the country so long-distance hacking won’t work.

Your Turn: How do you protect yourself from data breaches? Share your best tips with us in the comments!

SOURCES:
https://thepointsguy.com/2017/09/credit-card-security-breach-sonic/ 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.usatoday.com/story/708850001/  https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cnbc.com/amp/2017/10/04/sonic-shares-dip-on-news-of-payment-breach.html 
https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.businessinsider.com/report-sonic-security-breach-could-affect-millions-2017-9

Equifax Breach: What Happened And How Can You Protect Yourself?

On September 8, 2017, Equifax, one of the major credit reporting agencies, announced a 8480c-hackerbreach from mid-May through July 2017.  During this period, hackers accessed people’s names, social security numbers, birth dates, addresses, drivers license numbers, and credit card numbers.

Equifax has set up a Web site — https://www.equifaxsecurity2017.com — that anyone concerned can visit to see if they may be impacted by the breach. The site also lets consumers enroll in TrustedID Premier, a 3-bureau credit monitoring service (Equifax, Experian and Trans Union) which also is operated by Equifax.

According to Equifax, when you begin, you will be asked to provide your last name and the last six digits of your Social Security number. Based on that information, you will receive a message indicating whether your personal information may have been impacted by this incident. Regardless of whether your information may have been impacted, the company says it will provide everyone the option to enroll in TrustedID Premier. The offer ends Nov. 21, 2017.

In addition, you should closely monitor your accounts with financial institutions.  At Destinations, you can set up a “code” word that you will be asked whenever you call in to perform a transaction.  To do that, log into your Online Banking and go to “Info Center” –> “Personal Information” and click the Edit button.  This will allow you to add a code word.  As an additional security measure, you will receive a message in the e-mail you have on record with Destinations to notify you that personal information has been changed.

As always, you should get your free credit reports from all three credit bureaus at least annually.  You can get them all at once or request each at different times of the year.  To get your free credit reports, go to annualcreditreport.com to get yours.

Beware Of Phishing Scams!

Scammers never take a break! Just when you think they’ve run out of steam, another *scam surfaces in which fraudsters try to quietly take both your money and information.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has warned of a recent upsurge in phishing scams involving credit unions. With just a bit of online digging, scammers lure victims into forking over thousands of dollars or divulging confidential information.

Like all phishing scams, the scammer contacts the victim, posing as a legitimate business or service provider that the victim is familiar with. In this case, the scammers claim to be a representative of your credit union.

The fraudsters use social engineering to trap their victims. This means they take advantage of social norms to inspire trust and manipulate people into clicking on their links or answering their emails. It’s almost impulsive for people to download attachments that look like they’re from friends or a familiar business.

The scammers most commonly reach out via email, but they may also use mediums like phone calls, text messages or social media sites. They convince the victims of their legitimacy by providing some personal details about the victim – which they easily pull off the internet.

Victims are lured into providing information with the promise of compensation for a survey or by claiming the victim needs to verify or update an account. Once the scammer has the information, they can empty the victim’s accounts, track their online activity and/or steal their identity.

Alternately, the scammer may lead a victim to click on links that are embedded with spyware. The links lead to a website that may look just like the credit union’s site, but is actually bogus. In such instances, the victim is probably certain they’re browsing their credit union’s website, and won’t hesitate to share information or input usernames and passwords.

The biggest clue that these transactions are scams is their means of communication. Your credit union will never ask for sensitive information through insecure channels. We also won’t ask you to verify your account number – we already have that information!

Despite this red flag, hundreds of people are falling prey to phishing scams. Don’t be the next victim! Here are four tips to help you protect yourself from phishing scams:

1.) Ignore suspicious emails

When online, be on guard. If you receive an email from an unidentifiable source, ignore it. Don’t reply to the email, click on any embedded links or open attachments. If you suspect an email is from a scammer, delete it and add the domain and email address to your spam filter to prevent a recurrence.

Similarly, never “friend” or otherwise accept communications from a stranger via social media. Facebook and Snapchat are for real buddies only!

As a general rule, it’s best not to share any personal information over the internet. If you do need to provide financial information over the web for completing a transaction, only use a secured site. You can verify a site’s security by looking for a lock icon on the browser’s status bar or by finding a URL that begins with “https.” The “s” signifies that this is a secure site. Remember, though, that these indicators are not foolproof in any way. Even a secure site can be hacked.

2.) Alert Destinations Credit Union

The best way to stop scammers in their tracks is to report every attempt they make. If you have reason to believe you’ve been contacted by a scammer impersonating [credit union], let us know! Send us an email with all the details of the scam attempt so we can catch those crooks. It’s best to forward the exact email you received. If you’ve already deleted the email, report the date, time of day and all other details you can recall. The more we have to work with, the easier our hunt will be.

3.) Report all suspicious activity

While we will do all we can to stop these phishing scams, we can use all the help we can get. That’s why it’s important to file your complaint at www.ftc.gov. You can also visit the FTC’s Identity Theft website at www.consumer.gov/idtheft to learn how to minimize the fallout of a possible identity theft.

4.) Strengthen your computer’s protection

It’s always a good idea to beef up your computer’s border control. Equipping yourself with sufficient antivirus software will protect it from accepting these emails in the first place. If your software doesn’t update automatically, be sure to update it manually on a frequent basis so it will recognize and reject the most current viruses and scams.

A strong firewall will prevent scams and viruses by making you invisible on the internet and blocking all communication from foreign, unauthorized sources. It’s especially prudent to run a firewall if you use a broadband connection.

If you’re a genuine social media junkie, be sure to make your settings as private as possible. Don’t lay out your life for just anyone to see. Having another few hundred “friends” or “likes” is not worth the risk of a stolen identity!

Finally, as mentioned above, all suspicious email addresses should be added to your email’s blacklist as quickly as possible. Remember: Your spam filter is only as strong as you allow it to be.

With precaution, alertness and the proper steps toward prevention, you can keep yourself safe from phishing scams!

Your Turn: Have you ever reported suspicious emails or other messages? What made you flag it as a scam? Share your experience with us in the comments!

SOURCES:
https://www.navyfederal.org/security/phishing-scams.php 

https://www.mycreditunion.gov/protect/fraud/pages/default.aspx 
https://insightcreditunion.com/tools/fraud_prevention/how_not_to_get_hooked_by_a_phishing_scam.aspx 
https://www.mccoyfcu.org/security-center/fraud-and-scams.html 

All You Need to Know About Ransomware

This past year has seen some of the worst cyberattacks in history. From the WannaCryransomware attack in May to the Petya attack in June, thousands of people have lost thousands of dollars and valuable data to criminals using ransomware.

Ransomware has been tagged as an “epidemic” by major security companies. Like a virus that keeps evolving, new strains of ransomware are constantly emerging, many of them using new and original techniques that haven’t been tried before.

You probably already know the intended goal of ransomware is to kidnap a victim’s data and demand payment for safe return. Educating yourself about the workings of ransomware will help you remain alert, aware, and keep your money and data safe.

Here’s all you need to know about ransomware:

What is ransomware?

Ransomware is a subset of malware. However, instead of trying to steal user credentials and interrupt key processes like most forms of malware, it tries isolating a victim’s data and then demanding payment for the data’s release.

Ransomware is often embedded inside harmless-looking software and applications. It activates as soon as the user launches the program. Devices can also be infected through email links or malicious websites. Victims may not know they’re under attack until they find that their files are locked and a ransom demand is asking for money for the return of those files.

How does a ransomware attack work?

There are two primary types of ransomware: locker and crypto.

Locker ransomware locks victims from using important device functions like accessing a desktop or browsing the internet.

Crypto is the more common form of ransomware. It encrypts files and demands a ransom payment for their return.

In a crypto ransomware attack, a user’s device is infected with a malicious code which will select certain files and encrypt them using a unique algorithm. Victims will then receive a warning screen accusing them of breaking the law or simply informing them that they’re under attack. The cybercrooks will demand a ransom payment, usually in bitcoins. Then, a countdown timer begins, forecasting the files’ deletion if no payment is made.

What is bitcoin?

Bitcoin is a form of digital currency that allows you to pay for goods or services easily, remotely and anonymously. You can send bitcoins digitally using a mobile app or a computer.

This currency is stored in a digital wallet, which resides in the cloud or on your computer. It’s almost like a checking account, only it’s not insured by the FDIC nor is it subject to any regulations. Also, bitcoins aren’t tied to any country and have no credit card fees.

Each bitcoin transaction is available on a public log. However, only wallet IDs are revealed – the names of buyers and sellers are anonymous. This assured anonymity is the reason bitcoin payments have become the payment method of choice for cybercriminals.

To make a bitcoin payment, victims are usually instructed to download anonymous browsers for visiting a URL hosted on anonymous servers.

To pay or not to pay?

Should the victim of an attack pay the ransom for their files’ return? That is the million-dollar question!

While many are quick to give a blanket “no,” other experts say it may be worthwhile to pay the ransom.

Joseph Bonavolonta, the assistant special agent in charge of the FBI’s Cyber and Counterintelligence Program, claims that the FBI often advises people to pay the ransom.

He explains that when more people pay the ransom, it keeps the ransoms low. He also believes that most scammers will keep their word and decrypt the victim’s files.

However, other FBI officials disagree with Mr. Bonavolonta’s remarks and urge victims not to pay ransoms. They say there is never a guarantee of the files’ return, and that agreeing to the cybercrooks’ demands encourages more attacks.

One thing everyone agrees on, though, is that victims should seek assistance from law enforcement agencies. When victims share the names of their attackers or the details of their attack, the law enforcement agents will be able to tell them whether they’ve seen this group attack before and whether the group tends to return encrypted files.

If your computer’s been infected and you decide to pay the ransom, you may be looking at a payment that falls anywhere between $200 and $10,000.

Before you pay, though, find out if there’s a decryption tool online. You may be able to find the keys to decrypt your files on your own.

If you decide not to pay the ransom, shut down your computer and disconnect from your network. Scan your computer with an anti-virus or anti-malware program and let it remove everything on your device.

Prevention

It’s always best to be proactive. Ward off strangers by strengthening your email’s spam filter. Also, don’t ever click on suspicious links or download mobile apps from unfamiliar application stores.

Make sure your operating system (OS) is protected with a strong firewall, spyware and sufficient, updated anti-virus software.

It’s equally important to back up your files on an external hard drive or on a USB every few weeks.

Despite your best efforts, you may be the victim of a ransomware attack. If the unthinkable happens, keep your cool, contact a law enforcement agency to get info about your attacker, and check for a decryption tool online. If you do decide to pay, make sure to take preventive measures against future attacks.

Your Turn: Have you been the victim of a ransomware attack? Share your experience with us in the comments!

SOURCES:
http://links.ismgcorp.com/dc/zw7oNi_TweRxxDXp2CfOI676ee7YeNA5vLpZhs7Qp1nFj4hUFQbjnMysWYK-R50E8_CM-mB1LJAZBwY9hTVltvqCj0VhFFbDvHChOElx17O-x_DgGFHYFeL0osgs-vdGLy4MbBnkVtaKUNAxkZWT3dZ-_QU4yWgF7U0GEFM29DI=/x0Z0040D0nI0pkX0xd3U2Ic  

 https://www.columnit.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-ransomware.html

How To Respond To ‘Can You Hear Me?’


“Can you hear me now?” is the once-popular tagline of Verizon commercials, but it’s also the headline of a new scam. Scammers making robocalls will ask some innocuous question. Once the targeted person says “yes,” a recording is made of the response and it is used to sign up the target for unwanted, expensive services. It’s a scheme that’s been targeted at businesses before, but it has now shifted targeting to individual consumers across the country. 

Scheme variants

Robocallers have gotten increasingly sophisticated over the years. They’re doing everything in their power to mimic real sales calls. A pleasant-sounding voice might ask an innocuous question, like “Can you hear me?” or “Are you a homeowner?” The objective is to get you to say “Yes.” That’s all the scammer needs.

The scammer may then send you an invoice for a service. They may also bill your phone number directly, or attempt to make a charge using your credit card. When you call to contest the charges, the scammer will use your recorded “yes” to intimidate you into paying.

Even if the scammer doesn’t successfully bill you, your “yes” can still be hurtful. Answering the phone and talking demonstrates that your number is a viable target for telemarketing. The scammer may bundle your information with other victims and sell it to other potential scammers.

How to avoid it

The easiest way to avoid being a target in this scam is not to answer your phone if an unknown number calls. For many people, though, that’s not an option. If you’re job hunting, freelancing or even selling things on Craigslist, unknown numbers represent opportunities. Not answering your phone could mean missing out on the job of your dreams.

Until you can figure out if you’re talking to a real person, it’s best to avoid giving straightforward answers. If someone asks if you can hear them, say “I can hear you just fine.” If they ask a personal question, ask them why they want to know. Both of these responses will throw a robocall or a call center employee off script, giving you an opportunity to see if it’s a real person calling with a real opportunity or a scammer wasting your time.

It’s also worth repeating that you should never give out personal information over the phone. Often, phone scammers will claim to be a representative of some government entity as an attempt to scare you into turning over your information. Don’t believe them. Unless you initiate the call, government officials don’t do business over the phone.

You can also register your number on the federal Do Not Call registry at www.donotcall.gov. That way, if scammers do call, you can report the number to the FTC. These complaints help the FTC to find and shut down people illegally using the phone system, and hopefully putting an end to these scams once and for all.

If you’ve been targeted…

There’s no way for a scammer to use a recording of your voice to do any serious damage, according to researchers at snopes.com. It’s more likely that the scammer will try to intimidate you into paying by claiming that the voice recording is authorization of charges. Know your rights: Unless you’ve given someone your payment information and explicitly authorized them to charge you, you’re not responsible for paying those bills. Don’t be intimidated into giving up payment information because of threatening language. These scammers can’t actually do anything to you.

It’s still a good idea to keep a careful eye on your account statements and phone bills, just in case. Most phone providers have what’s called “bill-through” service, where third-party charges will be placed on your phone bill. It’s how some apps work, but it’s also how an alarming number of scams work.

Through a practice called “cramming,” third parties can pile unauthorized charges on your phone bill. By keeping the charges small and the names innocuous, third parties can rack in millions across the country for services that consumers don’t want and didn’t agree to purchase. While illegal, it’s still a widespread problem because voice authorization can make it more difficult to dispute the charges.

Make sure you understand exactly the purpose of each item on your phone bill. If there’s anything you don’t recognize, call your phone provider immediately. Disputing charges early is the best way to get them off your bill and keep that money in your pocket.

Your Turn: What’s your best practice for identifying robocallers? Share your tips and tricks in the comments!


Ransomware: The Modern Equivalent Of Being Tied To Train Tracks


When we think of ransom, we typically think of a black-and-white movie with a kidnapper leaving notes made from a variety of newspaper cuttings. Today, ransom is much less melodramatic, much more common and targets something you might not expect: your computer files. 

In late 2013, the ransomware threat was added to the list of things that can kill your computer alongside bugs and crashes. Hackers made a new bug that’s capable of taking over a computer, encrypting all its files and displaying a brief message demanding money to decrypt them. Sometimes, affected companies or individuals would pay up, the hacker would decrypt the computer as promised and everyone would be on their merry way. Victims would sometimes refuse to pay the fees in the given time and would then lose their valuable files forever. And sometimes, victims would fork over the cash, only to have the hackers disappear with the files still locked and therefore as lost as before the victims paid up.
One study estimates that in its first 100 days as a scheme, ransomware infected 250,000 computers. It earned the hackers a collected $6 million in bitcoins. If that trend continued, we can expect that they’ve hacked at least 24 million computers in the past two years. including one major hospital that reportedly forked over $17,000 to get its files back.
The original operator of ransomware, Cryptolocker, was shut down in May of 2014. Still, many ransomware copies arose shortly after and continues to wreak havoc. The program continues to evolve, now locking computers and displaying menacing countdowns to create a heightened sense of urgency to pay up.

The question now, of course, is what you should do to protect yourself. For starters, if the only computer you have to worry about is a private computer, ransomware is a less significant risk. Ransomware scammers tend to target computers of companies that have the capability to hand over large sums of money. If your computer handles the larger functions of a company, there are still some steps you can take to protect yourself.

1.) Don’t trust online solutions

For starters, there are many software programs that promise to completely rid your computer of ransomware, but those are best left on the virtual shelf. Ironically, some of those alleged file-saving downloads are actually ransomware in disguise. Your best bet is to backup your files however you can – onto an external hard drive, onto a separate computer or even on paper. Anything you do will ensure that, when the hackers come, you’ll already have those encrypted files elsewhere. It’s advisable to check at least once a month to ensure everything you need is safely backed up.

2.) Hold onto your money

While it might seem like the only option that gives you a chance to get your files back, the FBI has issued a statement asking people not to pay such ransoms. If hackers are paid, they have more incentive to continue, and payment really doesn’t influence whether they decrypt your files or not. “The FBI does not condone payment of ransom, as payment of extortion monies may encourage continued criminal activity, lead to other victimizations, or be used to facilitate serious crimes,” as FBI Special Agent Christopher Stangl elaborates in an interview. If you’re desperate for your files, paying may seem like the only option, but consider the difference that could be made if no one paid them anymore. Crime syndicates would be stopped without any work from the FBI.

3.) Call the cops, but don’t hold your breath

Many are currently asking whether anything significant has been done by the FBI to this point. This includes Sen. Ron Wyden, who wrote to James Comey, the director of the FBI, to ask how the agency intended to clean up the ransomware problem. Comey responded that they were making progress, but pointed out that making arrests wasn’t easy as “most of the top cybercriminal actors are located outside of the United States.” Still, he went on to assure Wyden that, “The FBI is committed to following the money in investigating all crimes with a financial component; ransomware is no exception.”

4.) Back up and stay safe

While the FBI has its best men on the task of catching these cyber culprits, it’s your responsibility to be as safe as possible until they do. Back your files up. Don’t click on any sketchy-looking links. Buy security that a trusted provider assures you is safe. Ransom is no longer a thing of black-and-white movies; but in the digital age, it’s still our job to protect ourselves.
SOURCES:
Photo Source:  From Barney Oldfield‘s “Race For A Life” 1913 Silent Movie.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2901672/how-to-prevent-ransomware-what-one-company-learned-the-hard-way.html