Why Do I Need To Get Preapproved For A Loan?

Q: I’m in the market for a new home, and everyone I talk to, from friends to financial Home with Sold Sign in frontadvisors, suggests I get preapproved for a mortgage before I start house hunting. Why is this so important?

A: You’re actually on the receiving end of great advice. When looking to take out a large loan, whether it’s for purchasing a home or buying a car, having that preapproval in hand before you start your search is crucial.

Depending upon the type of loan, the process of getting preapproved for a loan can take time. The lender will begin by asking for your financial history and other personal information. If you have a co-borrower, the lender will need this information about them as well.

You’ll be asked to provide your Social Security Number (SSN) and for permission to allow the lender to access your credit report. If the information you provide is satisfactory, as is your credit report, the lender will begin constructing the details of your loan. When they have determined how large of a loan you will be eligible for, they will grant you a preapproval letter. The letter will also detail your estimated interest rate on the loan, though that will sometimes also depend upon the specifics of your purchase, such as the year and condition of a car or appraisal on a home.

Having your preapproval letter will shorten the loan process significantly when you’re actually ready to take out the loan. However, that is only a small benefit of getting preapproved before you start “shopping.”

Here are some other advantages of getting preapproved for a loan:

1.) You’ll know what you can afford

Your preapproval will tell you exactly what you can afford. This way, you’ll avoid being disappointed later when you have your heart set on a certain home only to be told you can’t swing it financially. Knowing how large a loan you’ll qualify for will simplify your search and get you into your new home or car sooner.

Be sure to calculate other monthly costs, such as property taxes, home insurance and increased auto insurance rates when determining the actual amount of money you’ll need to shell out each month.

2.) Don’t get taken for a ride

Picture this scene at a car dealership:

Salesperson: So, you’re here to buy a new car! What are you looking for?

You: Well, I want something with a smooth ride and –

Salesperson: Got it. And how much of a monthly payment can you afford?

You: Weeelll, I think I can swing up to $200 a month, but I’d rather something closer to $150 if you —

Salesperson: Step right this way please! Let me show our new line of Camrys at just $205 a month! They have the most luxurious feel and the ride is smooth as butter!

What happened here is, quite simply, a salesperson looking to make the most money out of a customer. When you’re unsure about how much you can spend, the dealer will capitalize on your uncertainty and try to sell you a car that just barely skims the maximum amount you’ve decided you can afford.

Also, when you name a monthly payment you can manage, the dealer will work with that number instead of talking about the price of the car. They may try to inflate the payment with charges and fees just because they fit within your named payment amount.

In contrast, when you show up at the dealer with a preapproval in hand, the salesman will have to show you cars with price tags that fit within your loan amount.

Don’t get taken for a ride; get your preapproval before you set foot in the dealer shop!

3.) Be taken seriously

A car dealer will take you a lot more seriously when you wave that preapproval in their face, since having that information in hand shows you’re ready to buy.

When purchasing a home, the same rule holds true. A realtor will be able to assist you more efficiently when you know exactly how much house you can afford. They may also give you better service since you’re showing that you’re serious about buying a home. In fact, many realtors refuse to show homes to buyers who don’t have a preapproval in hand.

4.) Know you have financing you can trust

When you show up at the car dealership with a preapproval from your credit union, you know the deal is in your best interest. Many auto shops have access to several financing options and they’re almost always going to put customers into financing options that are in their own wallet’s best interests.

5.) Purchase your dream home

A preapproval makes you a valuable customer. It also helps you stand out from the pack. If you’re looking to buy a home in a competitive market, you may be competing with several other buyers for the same house. Having your preapproval will give you a leg up on bidding wars. A seller will be more eager to work with someone who’s already started the mortgage process. You can end your search sooner with a preapproval!

In the market for a new home or car? Don’t forget to call, click, or stop by Destinations Credit Union to hear about our fantastic rates on mortgage and auto loans!

Your Turn: Based on your own experience, why do you think it’s important to get preapproved for a loan? Share your thoughts with us in the comments!

SOURCES:
http://www.investopedia.com/mortgage/pre-approval/ 

https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/loans/advantages-of-getting-pre-approved-for-a-car-loan/
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.zillow.com/mortgage-learning/pre-approval/amp/

Your Real Net Worth


For accountants, your personal net worth is one of the simplest calculations they might be asked to perform. Add up your assets in column A, add your debt in column B, then subtract B from A to find your net worth. It’s a number you should know, or at least be able to estimate, and it’s good to check it every year.  Since it’s March, which is the sweet spot between New Year’s resolutions, January credit check-ups and tax time, there might not be a better time to figure out your net worth than right now.  When you do, don’t forget all of the value that might not translate into worth. We’ve got a short breakdown for you, along with a way to maximize the value in your life while minimizing how much it costs you: 

Your education increases your net worth, even though it may not look like it. Very few investments offer the rate of return that continuing education does. Those who finish their college degree earn, on average, about twice as much as those with a high school diploma over the course of their lifetimes, and the gap has been widening for at least 35 years. Still, your future earning potential doesn’t show up on your net worth, even though your student debt does. If you’re trying to decide whether to go back to school, take a few extra classes or get a new certification, the cost may seem intimidating since there’s no immediate benefit. Don’t let that fool you. 

An education can also increase the value you get out of your life, helping you find a job that makes you happier or getting that promotion you’ve been wanting at your current employer.  Outside of work, going back to school can help you learn a new language or skill you’ve always wanted to learn, get you up-to-date on current technology and trends in your field, and model good life choices for your children.  Just wait until they see you doing homework on a Friday night!

It also doesn’t have to cost an arm and a leg, and you don’t have to try for federal financial aid.  We have a variety of products designed to put some money in your pocket now, whether it’s a home equity loan, a personal loan, or any of our other financial plans.  If you’re thinking to yourself, “But I’ll be 40 (or 50, or 60) by the time I finish,” remember, you’ll be 40 (or 50, or 60) anyway.  


Find out information about our loans that could make it happen.

Your kids are a drain on your net worth, but a blessing in your life.  Let’s face it, kids are expensive. The Department of Agriculture estimates that raising a child born this year to the age of 18 will cost about $250,000.  While a quarter of a million dollars is a lot of money, that only gets them to age 18, but with tuition prices skyrocketing and kids staying at home longer than they have historically, the actual figure of raising children today gets much higher much faster.  Financial analysts predict the average four-year tuition for a public university in 2030 will be $250,000, or about the same as it cost to raise that child from birth to dropping them off at the dorm.  If you have two children, you could easily spend one million dollars on them before they leave college.  In your net worth, this is only reflected as a constant drain on your savings, a net negative.

The value of children is probably pretty obvious to you, but there has to be a way to lower the cost of raising them, right?  First, let’s cut down those college costs, because that’s half the battle.  We’ve got a Coverdell IRA college savings programs that offer good returns while also being tax-deductible.  Getting to $250,000 might seem like a pipe dream, but saving even a little every month can add up quickly, thanks to compound interest.

Next, let’s find a way to save money on school while helping your child now. There are a lot of ways to encourage a gifted child, from tennis camp to musical instruments.  If your child wants to stare at the Internet all day, maybe you should talk to them about a new laptop and some software engineering classes for kids.  If they like the outdoors (or you’d like them to go outside occasionally), try a digital camera.  All of these ideas cost money now, but could result in scholarships down the road, all while giving them a head start on a career or passion they can follow their whole life.  If you’re wondering how you can pay for all of that, check out our savings accounts.  You can contribute a little money every month, and you’ll have enough for those classes or that camera before you know it.

Your home is your biggest investment.  When was the last time you checked up on it?  When you bought your house, it might have been the best available house in the neighborhood for the price. After all, if it weren’t, you would have bought some other house, right?  Is it still the best in the neighborhood for the price?  Is the neighborhood still regarded the same way by home buyers?  How do you know? This weekend, it’s time for window shopping. Take the value of your home from your last appraisal and check the Internet for houses in your area in the same price range.  How does your house stack up? Make a list so you can compare between houses.  Next, check your decor. When you moved in, did the house feel a little dated?  Did you do anything about it? How many of the houses you saw online seemed newer or more fashionable? 

After you finish your house hunting, you’ve got three options:  If you saw a house that you like as much as the one you’re in now, but it’s going for less money, you could think about moving there.  After all, mortgage rates are incredibly low for the time being, and if you could be just as happy in a less expensive house, then that’s money you could use on something else.  If your house is as good or better as the others in the neighborhood, but could use a facelift, you might want to think about remodeling.  Remodeling your home can increase its value and make it easier to find a buyer, so part of what you spend now may come back to you when you sell, with the added benefit of living in a nicer house in the meantime. Finally, if your house is still the best around, think about refinancing while rates are low.  You’re probably not going to find fixed rates this low for a long time (if ever), so locking in that lower rate now can save you tons of money going forward, while cashing out some equity can help knock down any pesky credit card debt you need to take care of, so you only need to write one check every month, while paying far less in interest.

Brought to you by Destinations Credit Union

The Financial Lessons Of James Bond


Everybody’s favorite spy is back in theaters with the release of “Spectre.” To mark the occasion, we decided to take a look at his 50-plus year history to see what lessons we could learn about life and money from the greatest secret agent in film history. 

Develop your revenue streams. The Bond movies regularly earn more than $100 million in product placement, ensuring the profitability of his missions long before you or I pony up $7.50 for a ticket. For instance, in the Ian Fleming novels, James Bond wears a Rolex Oyster Perpetual. It’s a signature accessory, and in one scene early in the series, he drops the watch onto his fist to use it as a knuckle duster when punching a bad guy in the face.  The scene is beloved by many fans of the novel, which is why it was recreated during a scene during the Daniel Craig era. But it’s surprising when Craig’s Bond makes the move and he’s wearing an Omega watch.  Of course, the most famous Bond-worn watch is Sean Connery’s Rolex Submariner, but he’s also worn a digital Seiko and a Tag Heuer.

Bond has also forsaken his Aston Martin in favor of BMWs and Jaguars, while appearing in commercials for Heineken – a beer that should not be shaken or stirred. He’s indulged in Red Stripe and Coke Zero, flown Pan Am, used L’Oreal, and if you want to dress the part, you need look no further than Tom Ford, the luxury menswear designer responsible for providing the suits and evening wear for the Daniel Craig era. 

Do you have enough revenue streams?  Could you find other ways to make money?  There’s never been a better time to develop additional income.  With the prime interest rate so low, you can lock in an amazing fixed rate on a home equity loan to pursue your business idea or side project for building your fortune during the weekends. You can distribute your product, cultivate a customer base and conduct all of your transactions online, leaving a much larger chunk of your capital to produce a high-quality product or service. 

Keep cool.  In “Goldfinger,” or any of the Connery-era Bond films, the climax tended to revolve around an impending countdown to doomsday, stopped at the last moment by Bond.  He’s fought enough odd-looking henchmen to fill a small stadium, dispatching each with a quip that mixed fantastic timing with unflappable calm.  He’s flown airplanes sideways through hangars and driven tanks through Moscow’s rush hour.  Through it all, James Bond stays cool.  The man can scuba dive up to the bad guy’s island hideout, unzip his wet suit and immediately have on a perfectly pressed tuxedo.  Cool.

Are you cool?  Not in terms of driving the carpool and earning the grudging respect of the tweens in the back seat, but in terms of the ability to drop a one-liner in the face of worldwide annihilation. To put it another way, how rattled are you by the rough year the stock market has had? Don’t let a hiccup on Wall Street ruin your retirement. Instead, buoy your investments with our fantastic savings products. You can reduce your exposure to risk, making it easier to take a deep breath, while having easier access to your money in times of stress. 

Keep your house in good order.  The film plot of “Skyfall” was two hours of “The Dark Knight” followed by half an hour of “Home Alone.” The climax of the film involves a return to Bond’s childhood home, which he manages to turn into a fortress with an afternoon’s work. 

If your house isn’t ready to repel invaders, don’t worry.  Home improvement is easy with a home equity lineof credit.  You get all of the spending flexibility of a credit card, so you can use the money you need when you need to on a revolving line of credit, paying it back in chunks when you can afford to do so, but you can do it at a much lower rate than a credit card because you secure the loan with the equity you already have in your house.  And the interest you pay may be tax deductible (consult your tax advisor on this one). 

Don’t be fooled by the luxuries James Bond enjoys.  It might not seem like a path to financial security, but what if you bought all of the luxuries that James Bond buys? In the films, we’ve seen him drive incredibly expensive vehicles in wonderfully exotic locations while wearing fabulously expensive clothes. We’ve also never seen him buy any of them. He’s received them from MI6, which is why it’s so easy for him to blow them all up.

Are you trying to live the James Bond lifestyle?  James Bond doesn’t even live the James Bond lifestyle. He lets the taxpayers foot the bill while he gets by on a public servant’s wage. You’ll be much happier living within your means and finding the luxuries when you can.

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