The Pros And Cons Of Bridge Loans

Buying your second home is nothing like buying your first. This time around, you’re bridge loancoming to the table with the experience of being a homeowner. You know what to expect throughout the buying process, you know what to look for in a home and you know what you can afford. After all, experience is truly the best teacher.

Another major difference this time around is that you’re likely counting on proceeds from the sale of your first home to help cover the down payment and the closing costs of your new home.

But what happens if selling that home is taking a bit longer than you’d anticipated? What if you need to move immediately because of a job opportunity, or because there’s a great home on the market that will be snatched up if you don’t grab it quickly? How are you going to come up with the funds if your own home isn’t selling quickly?

This is where bridge loans come in. A bridge loan provides temporary financing until more permanent financing can be obtained. When taking out a bridge loan, it’s understood that once permanent financing is in place, some of those funds will be used to pay back the bridge loan. Bridge loans are most commonly used to help the borrower span the gap between the sale of one home and the purchase of another.

Terms vary tremendously, so take the time to talk with your loan officer. Some will completely pay up the outstanding mortgage on the old home, while others will only pay off a portion of it, leaving the borrower with two mortgages, or simply lumping the loans together.

Bridge loans understandably have shorter terms than other loans, and are typically more expensive as well. Also, a lender will usually only extend a bridge loan if the borrower agrees to finance their new home’s mortgage through the same institution.

Bridge loans seem to provide the ideal solution to a less-than-ideal situation: You can now house-hunt freely and without waiting for your current home to sell. However, bridge loans are not as simple as they may seem.

Let’s take a look at some of the pros and cons of taking out a bridge loan.

Pros

1.) Freedom to house-hunt

The most obvious benefit of taking out a bridge loan is also the most significant. With this financing in place, you’ll be free to buy the home of your choice, without being bound by the sale of your previous home.

2.) Short lending term

Another big benefit of bridge loans is their short lifespan. Bridge loans usually run for six-month terms, though they can span anywhere from several weeks to several years. In contrast, most conventional loans are structured around a long payback term that can last for decades. The longer the payback term, the more likely it is that the borrower will suffer from a financial setback, which makes repayment challenging or impossible.

This, in turn, can give rise to further financial challenges as the borrower is hit with various penalties and fees, or is forced to take out another loan. The short payback term of bridge loans assures that this loan will not be a source of financial stress for years to come.

Cons

1.) Total debt increases

Any loan a buyer takes out will cause their total debt to climb. Sometimes, a bridge loan will split the purchase of the second home into two mortgages, leaving a buyer with three monthly mortgage payments; one from their previous home, and two from their new one. Other times, the buyer will be left with two mortgages to pay, which can also be a strain on their budget. In either case, an increase in debt means an increase in monthly financial obligations.

2.) High interest rates and fees

To compensate for their short lifespans and the amount of work the lender has to do for them, bridge loans generally have high interest rates, generally reaching between 8.5 – 10.5% of the total loan. There are also various fees involved, such as closing costs, origination fees and more.

3.) Risky contingency

Bridge loans are usually taken out with the understanding that the sale of your existing home will allow you to repay the loan. But what if your house doesn’t sell before the loan is due? This can happen even if you have an interested buyer – they may not get the financing they need or they may back out. This will leave you with a huge debt on your hands that you can’t afford to repay.

It’s important to speak to a Realtor about market conditions before taking out a bridge loan, even if you think you have a buyer. Make sure the odds are in your favor and that it is likely your home will be sold on time before committing to a loan that is contingent on its sale.

If you really need the funds from the sale of your home before the transaction is finalized, but the thought of taking out a bridge loan makes you uneasy, you may want to consider other options. You can take out a HELOC, borrow against a 401(k) plan or take out a loan secured by stocks, bonds or other assets.

And of course, don’t forget to call, click, or stop by Destinations Credit Union for guidance throughout the process of buying and selling a home.

Your Turn: Have you bought a second home recently? How was the purchase different than your first time around? Share your experience with us in the comments!

SOURCES:
http://www.bankrate.com/finance/mortgages/bridge-loans-ease-the-transition-from-one-home-to-another-at-a-cost.aspx 
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridge_loan 
https://www.thebalance.com/what-are-bridge-loans-1798410 
http://m.finweb.com/real-estate/the-pros-and-cons-of-bridge-loan-financing.html  

Rising Interest Rates: What Do They Mean For You?


If you read financial headlines, you’ve no doubt seen the news that the Federal Reserve is raising interest rates. These headlines can be accompanied with all sorts of hyperbole about the end of the stock market, the boom of bonds or any of a dozen other possible predictions. It’s easy to get overwhelmed when there’s this much information and so much of it is conflicting. Let’s set the record straight on what rising prime interest rates mean for you.
The prime interest rate is the rate that the Federal Reserve charges financial institutions to borrow from it. It influences a lot of other financial prices. Many of these are only of concern to investment bankers, professional investors and other economic enthusiasts. Here are some key ways the prime rate hikes can affect you!
1.) Think about your ARM
Many people opted for adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs) when interest rates were historically low. These mortgages often have much better rates for an introductory period, usually five years (please note – a Destinations Credit Union ARM holds the rate for 10 years), before they adjust to a new rate. That new rate is determined in large part by the rate the Federal Reserve charges.
The Federal Reserve is planning to continue to increase interest rates as the economy continues to improve. This means the rate on your ARM may go up as well. Worse yet, the rising rates could make your monthly mortgage payment unpredictable, putting you in a bit of a budget bind. Fortunately, you can refinance your mortgage into a fixed-rate loan and take advantage of still-low interest rates. You may still be able to secure a low rate on a 10-, 15- or 30-year fixed-rate mortgage. As interest rates continue to rise, your fixed-rate mortgage will stay the same, meaning your savings will increase as time goes on.
2.) Balance your portfolio
The historically low interest rates over the past six years have done wonders for the stock market. Because companies could borrow at affordable rates, they could expand rapidly. That expansion fuels growth in stock prices.
As interest rates rise, that credit availability will decrease. Companies will find it more difficult to expand, and their growth will slow. This slowing of growth may lead to a decline in stock prices.
However, as interest rates rise, bond rates will also increase. That will lead to an increase in their price as more investors chase those rates. Individual investors need to ensure their portfolios are properly balanced to take advantage of changing market conditions. Speaking to a financial adviser to ensure your assets are where they need to be will help keep your investments growing at a healthy rate.
3.) Save more
The Federal Reserve interest rate also affects the rates that financial institutions are able to offer account holders. As it becomes more expensive to borrow from other institutions, it’s more profitable for those institutions to “borrow” from their members in the form of certificates and savings accounts. As interest rates continue to rise, it’ll be increasingly more profitable to sock your money away in an interest-bearing account.
If you’ve been putting off opening a certificate or increasing the deposits in your share account, now is an excellent time to consider it. With a 12- or 24-month certificate, you can take advantage of rising interest rates while still leaving yourself the flexibility to re-invest once interest rates rise again.
4.) Refinance your debt
The service charges on several kinds of debt are tied to the prime rate. Notably, credit cards and private student loan rates may increase as the prime rate continues to climb. That makes now a great time to think about refinancing.
Take advantage of currently low interest rates with several strategies. A home equity line of credit can help bundle your high-interest, unsecured debt with your low-interest mortgage. A personal loan for refinancing can also help secure a better interest rate. Other options exist, and the sooner you speak with a debt counselor or other financial professional, the better off you’ll be.
It’s easy to get overwhelmed by all the financial terminology surrounding news events like rate hikes. That’s why it’s best to have an advocate in your corner to help you figure out what to make of a changing economic landscape.  Destinations Credit Union can do just that. Call, click or stop by to speak to a member services representative about how you can take advantage of this opportunity and put yourself on the path to financial wellness.

Your Turn: Got questions about rising interest rates? Leave your questions in the comments. Or, if you’ve got a handle on all things economic, share your wisdom with others!


Adjustable-Rate Mortgages (ARM)

A first mortgage typically has a set interest rate. The monthly payment stays the same regardless of the term. It doesn’t matter how much the economy, the Federal Reserve or your income change. Your interest rate is locked in over the life of the loan.
An Adjustable-Rate Mortgage (ARM), on the other hand, has an interest rate that can change periodically. These loans usually have a period of time in which the interest rate is fixed, commonly called the “initial rate,” which can last from as little as a month to as much as 5 years. After that period, the rate can change. How frequently it can change is determined by the adjustment period. In the most common type of ARM, a 5/1 ARM, the initial rate is set for 5 years and the adjustment period is 1 year. This means that after the first 5 years of the loan, the rate can change every year.
ARMs look very attractive at first glance because they’re usually listed with much lower interest rates. That rate is only the initial rate, although there are a few limitations on how high the interest rate can go after that period. If interest rates go up, that adjustment can have you paying more once the initial term completes. However, if interest rates go down, an ARM can actually become less expensive!
The Index and the Margin
The adjustable rate isn’t set arbitrarily. They’re set by the rate of return on some major investment vehicle. The most common one is the London Inter-Bank Offer Rate (LIBOR). This is the interest rate that the world’s largest banks charge each other for short-term loans. Investors feel confident that these loans will be repaid, so the LIBOR is a benchmark for safe investments, like mortgages. This rate serves as the index for the ARM rate at many financial institutions.
Because individual home buyers are less secure than the world’s largest banks, investors take on more risk by putting their money into an ARM. To reflect that increased risk, ARMs also include a margin. This is an additional interest rate the lender tacks on to the index rate. The margin is typically locked in for the duration of the loan. The two together are the fully indexed rate, and that’s the rate you’ll be charged once the adjustments begin.
Periods and Caps
Fortunately, there’s a limit to how often a lender can change the rate of the mortgage. This adjustment period provides some measure of stability. Typically, ARMs don’t have adjustment periods that are any longer than one year (after the initial period) or any shorter than one quarter.
There are also limits on how much the interest rate can increase in one period, called a periodic cap. No matter how high the index goes, your interest rate can’t be increased in one period by more than a set percentage. If your ARM includes a 2% periodic cap, and the underlying index rate increases by 3%, your rate will still only increase by 2%.
That extra 1% isn’t gone, though. Many ARMs include a carryover provision, which means rate increases that were prevented by a cap may be applied during the next period. Even if the underlying index decreases, your rate could still be increased by any amount that was capped out.
Another kind of cap that exists for ARMs is the lifetime cap. These caps provide a limit on how high the rate can go during the term of the loan. If your initial rate is 6% and your ARM has a lifetime cap of 6%, your interest rate can never go above 12% no matter how high the underlying index rates get.
When are ARMs a good idea?
The riskiness of ARMs makes them a tough option for many people, especially on a primary residence. Unless you’re in a financial position to survive a mortgage payment doubling over the course of 10 years, an ARM can be hard to swallow. However, there are situations where the initial lower interest rate can make sense.
If you’re planning on selling the property before the initial period is over, the ARM can save you significantly on loan costs. If you intend to “flip” the house, or if your career involves frequent relocation, an ARM could be ideal for you. In this case, the gamble you’re making is less about the performance of an index and more about the performance of your area’s housing market. If demand drops, you could wind up holding on to an expensive mortgage or selling the house at a loss.
Some people choose ARMs because they plan to refinance after the initial period. The lower initial interest rates let them make extra principal payments, and they can then get better terms on a 15- or 30-year fixed rate for the remainder of the loan. This can also be a risky move if the value drops. The refinance may not be enough to cover the initial mortgage amount, leaving borrowers in a difficult position.
In general, choosing an ARM means planning to pay the balance of the loan before the end of the initial period. Otherwise, the unpredictability of the mortgage payment can make financial plans too complicated. Be sure to read and understand the terms of any mortgage, fixed or adjustable, before you sign!

Your Down Payment On A House

Q: I’m hoping to buy a house in the next few months. How much of a down payment should I have saved up?
A: When you think about your down payment, balance is key. If you think you might sell the house within just a few years of ownership, having a large down payment exposes you to greater risk if real estate prices fall. However, a larger down payment can also mean lower monthly payments.
The value of $1,000 is pretty hard to quantify, especially in a real estate market that might have $30,000 homes and $300,000 homes. Instead of thinking about the amount of money, think about a percentage of the value of the house. When making these decisions, here are three questions to ask yourself.
Can I put 20% down?
A down payment of 20% is something of a magic number. With 20% down, borrowers are no longer responsible for carrying Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). PMI is a protection most lenders require to cover their investment in you should you not repay your loan. The premiums for this insurance are paid by you, either as a lump sum at closing or included with the mortgage payment, and thus make your monthly payment higher. PMI usually costs between 0.5% and 1.0% of the value of the loan, though prices vary based upon several factors. Using this model, on a $100,000 loan, expect to pay around $83 more per month.
20% is also a magic number for interest rates. Lenders see a 20% down payment as a sign of a responsible borrower. Meeting that down payment amount means the borrower typically has a lifestyle of spending responsibly and saving money, both of which are signs of a solid credit risk. Regardless of your credit score, a 20% down payment can help save on the costs of the loan.
Can I get help to get there?
There are a wide variety of home buyer assistance programs designed to help people reach that 20% threshold. These come in two forms: grants and delayed repayment loans. They’re offered by housing departments at all levels of government and frequently go unused because home buyers don’t think they qualify.
Grants are no-strings-attached checks that you have to use for a specific purpose, in this case, the down payment on a home. Many are limited by income level or region of purchase, but they are definitely worth exploring. Even more options are open to first-time home buyers, former or current members of the armed forces and people in public service-oriented professions.
Delayed repayment loans are similar. These are second mortgages held by an organization for a portion of the total cost of the house. They do not begin accruing interest until after you’ve paid off your primary mortgage, and some of them are forgiven after you’ve owned the home for a certain amount of time. These are available from housing authorities and private organizations all over the country.
One important note: While you can get a lot of help, you cannot use another loan, even one from your parents or relatives, as part of your down payment. Doing so is a federal crime and can get you in serious trouble! In the best case, lenders will be suspicious of large deposits you can’t explain, and may even refuse to issue the mortgage loan.
If you can’t get to a 20% down payment, there are several options. You could make the smaller down payment, understanding that you’ll have to pay higher interest rates and PMI. You could also look at houses in lower price ranges. You might also decide to postpone home ownership and focus on saving so you can get there the next time around.
Should I go over 20%?
Making a very large down payment is an investment. Think of your mortgage like a savings account. You make an initial “deposit” when you make a down payment. A portion of your payment goes into your account each month while the rest goes to cover interest, which is the price you pay for living in your savings account. The return on your investment in the large initial down payment is the lower total interest you’ll have to pay.
When deciding if you want to put more than 20% down, think of your mortgage rate like the rate of return. If you can put another $1,000 down, that’s $1,000 less you’ll need to borrow. If your interest rate is 4%, then the return on that investment is $40 in interest you don’t have to pay. On the other hand, you don’t have that $1,000 to invest somewhere else now. If your retirement account earns 5%, then that same $1,000 will earn $50 if invested there. Making the larger down payment will end up “costing” you $10 in the long run.
As with any other investment decision, weigh the pros and cons. It may have a comparatively low rate of return, but the risk is negligible. Unless the value of your house drops dramatically, you won’t lose your down payment. It can be a smart move to put down as much as you can, but make sure to leave your retirement fund and emergency fund intact.

Mortgage Pre-qualification

Q: Every ad for mortgage companies I read talks about pre-qualification or pre-approval. Is that something I need to do before I start house shopping?

A: There are two phases to securing a mortgage.

Imagine the lending market as sort of trying to set up a friend on a date. You tell your friend about the partner you have in mind for them, and based on what you tell them, they decide if that person is worth a date. They’re considering the possibility of the date, assuming everything you say is true. If you tell your friend about the potential date’s persistent body odor problem, they might choose to say no. If you tell your friend about their beau-to-be’s interesting job, sense of humor or winning smile, they’d probably set up a date to see for themselves. That’s part 1.

Of course, your friend doesn’t go immediately from your description to wedding bells. First, they have to actually date and get to know each other. Your friend has to see if the qualities you described are actually true and make sure there’s nothing hiding beneath the surface that would rule them out. That’s part 2.

While it does make for some confusion, lenders may refer to either part 1 or part 2 as pre-approval, and the other as pre-qualification. Rather than focusing on the labels, focus on the steps involved and what the steps mean. We’ll keep calling them “part 1” and “part 2.”

What do I need for part 1?

In part 1 of the process, you describe your financial situation to a potential lender. Usually, this information includes salary, savings and current debts. The lender may or may not pull your credit score at this point. Based upon that information, the lender will make a determination about the kind of loan you might qualify for, assuming everything you’ve said is true.

You don’t need to prove anything at this point. It can be done over the phone, over the Internet or in person and no documentation is required.

During Part 1, you might want to compare possible mortgage rates. There’s a lot less paperwork involved, so it’s much easier to ask a lender to run through a variety of scenarios. You can look for a loan situation that combines the monthly payment, interest rate, term and down payment where you have the most comfort.

Part 1 can be completed early in the house shopping process. In fact, it makes sense to do this before you view the first house. That way, you won’t fall in love with a house you can’t possibly afford or convince yourself to settle for a house that doesn’t really meet your needs. This also gives you the chance to straighten out any potential kinks in your financial situation before starting part 2. Don’t worry about multiple checks on your credit if necessary. Credit bureaus lump mortgage inquiries within 30 days together as 1 inquiry, so they won’t adversely affect your credit score.

It’s important to note that pre-qualification is not a guarantee of a loan. To continue our example from above, your friend agreeing to a first date does not mean you get to start planning a wedding! Completing part 1 is a way to get an idea of how much you can afford to spend during your house hunting, as well as a way to show potential sellers that you’re serious. Completing part 1 illustrates to a buyer that you are already part of the way through the lending process, and it’s less likely that your financing will fall through.

What do I need for part 2?

Part 2 is where the paperwork starts to fly. At this point, a lender is deciding whether or not to issue you a loan. Successfully completing part 2 means a lender is ready and willing to provide you with a loan up to a specified amount.

To navigate this step, you’ll need to prove everything you claimed in part 1. This means you need to provide tax forms to substantiate your income and account statements to verify your savings. You’ll also need to sign a variety of forms giving your lender or their agents the power to talk to employers, landlords and the IRS about your financial security.

Generally, lenders will want tax returns for the past 2 years, including supporting documents like W-2 forms. If you’ve switched jobs a few times in that span, you may need to go further back to demonstrate consistent employment. If you’re an independent contractor or own a small business, documentation requirements are significantly steeper. You’ll need to provide enough financial disclosure to show lenders that you can make the payments.

Completion of part 2 is a conditional approval for a loan. If the house you’re buying passes appraisal, you will get financing on the terms you’ve agreed upon with your lender. The paperwork is a bit more cumbersome, so you don’t want to do this multiple times. Only complete this step with a lender you’re going to borrow from.

Part 2 is best to complete before you make an offer, especially in competitive markets. A letter of prequalification or preapproval that shows your financing is in place does a lot to reassure sellers that your offer will survive until closing. If you’re on the fence about what house you’ll put an offer on, this process can still be completed with the property identified as “to be determined”.

Don’t worry if this process seems confusing. You’ll be working with a qualified mortgage professional who deals with it every day and can answer all your questions. One of the benefits of working with Destinations Credit Union, an institution you trust, for your mortgage is that it clears your mind to focus on the important stuff, like where to put the sofa!

Your Real Net Worth


For accountants, your personal net worth is one of the simplest calculations they might be asked to perform. Add up your assets in column A, add your debt in column B, then subtract B from A to find your net worth. It’s a number you should know, or at least be able to estimate, and it’s good to check it every year.  Since it’s March, which is the sweet spot between New Year’s resolutions, January credit check-ups and tax time, there might not be a better time to figure out your net worth than right now.  When you do, don’t forget all of the value that might not translate into worth. We’ve got a short breakdown for you, along with a way to maximize the value in your life while minimizing how much it costs you: 

Your education increases your net worth, even though it may not look like it. Very few investments offer the rate of return that continuing education does. Those who finish their college degree earn, on average, about twice as much as those with a high school diploma over the course of their lifetimes, and the gap has been widening for at least 35 years. Still, your future earning potential doesn’t show up on your net worth, even though your student debt does. If you’re trying to decide whether to go back to school, take a few extra classes or get a new certification, the cost may seem intimidating since there’s no immediate benefit. Don’t let that fool you. 

An education can also increase the value you get out of your life, helping you find a job that makes you happier or getting that promotion you’ve been wanting at your current employer.  Outside of work, going back to school can help you learn a new language or skill you’ve always wanted to learn, get you up-to-date on current technology and trends in your field, and model good life choices for your children.  Just wait until they see you doing homework on a Friday night!

It also doesn’t have to cost an arm and a leg, and you don’t have to try for federal financial aid.  We have a variety of products designed to put some money in your pocket now, whether it’s a home equity loan, a personal loan, or any of our other financial plans.  If you’re thinking to yourself, “But I’ll be 40 (or 50, or 60) by the time I finish,” remember, you’ll be 40 (or 50, or 60) anyway.  


Find out information about our loans that could make it happen.

Your kids are a drain on your net worth, but a blessing in your life.  Let’s face it, kids are expensive. The Department of Agriculture estimates that raising a child born this year to the age of 18 will cost about $250,000.  While a quarter of a million dollars is a lot of money, that only gets them to age 18, but with tuition prices skyrocketing and kids staying at home longer than they have historically, the actual figure of raising children today gets much higher much faster.  Financial analysts predict the average four-year tuition for a public university in 2030 will be $250,000, or about the same as it cost to raise that child from birth to dropping them off at the dorm.  If you have two children, you could easily spend one million dollars on them before they leave college.  In your net worth, this is only reflected as a constant drain on your savings, a net negative.

The value of children is probably pretty obvious to you, but there has to be a way to lower the cost of raising them, right?  First, let’s cut down those college costs, because that’s half the battle.  We’ve got a Coverdell IRA college savings programs that offer good returns while also being tax-deductible.  Getting to $250,000 might seem like a pipe dream, but saving even a little every month can add up quickly, thanks to compound interest.

Next, let’s find a way to save money on school while helping your child now. There are a lot of ways to encourage a gifted child, from tennis camp to musical instruments.  If your child wants to stare at the Internet all day, maybe you should talk to them about a new laptop and some software engineering classes for kids.  If they like the outdoors (or you’d like them to go outside occasionally), try a digital camera.  All of these ideas cost money now, but could result in scholarships down the road, all while giving them a head start on a career or passion they can follow their whole life.  If you’re wondering how you can pay for all of that, check out our savings accounts.  You can contribute a little money every month, and you’ll have enough for those classes or that camera before you know it.

Your home is your biggest investment.  When was the last time you checked up on it?  When you bought your house, it might have been the best available house in the neighborhood for the price. After all, if it weren’t, you would have bought some other house, right?  Is it still the best in the neighborhood for the price?  Is the neighborhood still regarded the same way by home buyers?  How do you know? This weekend, it’s time for window shopping. Take the value of your home from your last appraisal and check the Internet for houses in your area in the same price range.  How does your house stack up? Make a list so you can compare between houses.  Next, check your decor. When you moved in, did the house feel a little dated?  Did you do anything about it? How many of the houses you saw online seemed newer or more fashionable? 

After you finish your house hunting, you’ve got three options:  If you saw a house that you like as much as the one you’re in now, but it’s going for less money, you could think about moving there.  After all, mortgage rates are incredibly low for the time being, and if you could be just as happy in a less expensive house, then that’s money you could use on something else.  If your house is as good or better as the others in the neighborhood, but could use a facelift, you might want to think about remodeling.  Remodeling your home can increase its value and make it easier to find a buyer, so part of what you spend now may come back to you when you sell, with the added benefit of living in a nicer house in the meantime. Finally, if your house is still the best around, think about refinancing while rates are low.  You’re probably not going to find fixed rates this low for a long time (if ever), so locking in that lower rate now can save you tons of money going forward, while cashing out some equity can help knock down any pesky credit card debt you need to take care of, so you only need to write one check every month, while paying far less in interest.

Brought to you by Destinations Credit Union

The Hows, Whys, And Whens Of Rate Locks


Q: Everyone I talk with about my house search tells me I need to shop mortgages and lock in a rate. What do they mean? 
If you’re on the market for a house now, congratulations. This is an historically good time to buy. Interest rates are low and prices are rising in most markets. Even if it seems like a disorienting and confusing process, home buying is worthwhile in the long run.
A rate lock is an agreement by a lender to ensure a rate on a loan for a set period of time. Regardless of what the mortgage market does before the closing date, the “points,” duration, and interest rate will remain the same. The lock agreement is valid until a few days after your expected closing date to account for any potential complications and can be rejected only if some serious error emerges during the qualification process. 
When should I get a rate lock? 
Rate lock agreements are usually offered for 30, 60 or 90 days. The longer term locks may seem like a good deal, but they usually come with higher origination fees. A 30-day rate lock might establish a 4.00% interest rate with a quarter point (or 0.25% of the value of the loan). A 60-day lock on that same loan might include a half point instead (0.50% of the loan).
It might be tempting to get your mortgage rate set in stone before you’ve started looking at homes so you have a good idea of your price range. As convenient as it sounds, doing so could cost you in the long run. Interest rates don’t change that fast. Over the past year, interest rates have gone from a low of 3.55% to a high of 4.20%. The worst month ever for mortgage rates saw an increase of about half a percent. That raises your monthly payment $35 on a $250,000 loan. To save that $35 per month, your lender may charge you $6,250 (a quarter point) up front! You won’t make up for that higher upfront cost for nearly 15 years. If, instead, you paid the higher interest rate and put that money in a savings account, you’d make about $2,000 over the life of your mortgage.
That said, ignoring your mortgage rate until the day before closing is also unwise. Your lender needs time to put together the paperwork for your loan. Ideally, you should get a rate lock sometime between a week and a month before you close. A pre-approval process should give you a good idea of your budget and can help your offer stand out in a sellers’ market. An easy closing transaction, instead of trying to time the market, should be your priority here. 
How do I lock my rate? 
One of the wisest things you can do in the home-buying process is to talk with your credit union representatives to let them know you are starting the process of buying a home. With many years of experience in home lending, they can help you identify some good strategies for determining the right home for you and streamline the process you’ll be following. They will also help you get started on pre-approval if appropriate at that time. Then, once you’ve found the right house and you’re ready to make it yours, let them know you are ready to lock your rate. After signing an agreement with your lender for the rate, points and duration, you’re all set. 
Why should I lock my interest rate? 
Locking your interest rate has two big benefits. It helps you prepare your new monthly budget and it helps your credit union get all the necessary paperwork in order for closing. Don’t think of your rate lock as a chance to score a deal. You won’t save much money. In fact, you could stand to lose quite a bit by trying. Think of it as a T-crossing and I-dotting exercise. Having a rate lock on a mortgage means one less piece of paperwork that stands between you and your new home.
If you’d like more information about current mortgage rates, saving for a down payment, or anything else about the home-buying process, reach out to your neighbors at Destinations Credit Union. Our supportive staff is there to help you every step of the way, from setting a budget to protecting your biggest investment. Call, email, or click your way to Destinations Credit Union today! 
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https://ycharts.com/indicators/30_year_mortgage_rate

This Guy Paid Off His Mortgage In Three Years. So, Why Does He Regret It And Why Is Everyone Angry At Him?


There’s not much in life that is more freeing than finally paying off a large bill. Suddenly, our checking accounts are flush, the future feels more open, and even our favorite jeans seem to fit better. When it comes to a mortgage, of course, that seems so far down the road it’s difficult to imagine, particularly for those just starting out.  If you’ve always paid rent or a mortgage, it just kind of feels like that bill is always there, the background noise of your life. 
So, when 30-year-old Canadian resident Sean Cooper paid off his mortgage in three years, he celebrated by burning his mortgage papers and found a news crew to film it.  But, here’s the twist: He isn’t happy about it, and judging from social media posts and comments on the news coverage, no one else is, either.  In fact, Cooper seems full of regret and everyone else is full of scorn or pity.  What’s going on?
Cooper sacrificed a lot to pay off his mortgage, and even he admits he focused too much on his financial goals.  He worked three jobs, including as a full-time CAD technician $75,000 (about USD $56,000) white-collar job, a customer service job at a local grocer, and writing freelance articles.  In addition, he supplemented his income by living in the basement of his home while he rented the house to others.  As many commenters note, that’s not a healthy way to live and it’s unsustainable.
Often, we lose sight of what’s around us when we focus on our financial goals.  That moment when the bill is paid seems so sweet that we don’t really think about everything it’ll take to get us there.  If you’d like to make financial headway on your mortgage without making yourself crazy, we’ve collected some tips below.  The key idea among them is finding a balance, so you’ll need to adjust them for your own personal situation.  If you’d like a more personal meeting to discuss your financial goals and finding balance, let us know.  Also, follow us on Facebook and Twitter. 
Take gigs, not jobs.  It’s easy to see why renting out one’s home and securing extra employment are so appealing.  Regular income feels safe and makes it easy to plan ahead.  But extra employment can also be confining; It’s difficult to work full-time and still find time for your hobbies, your family, or the occasional afternoon spent binge-watching Netflix (something everyone needs occasionally).  If you don’t find time for your hobbies, you’ll find that your job has become your hobby.  If you don’t spend time with your family, you just won’t have the bonds that families need.
Instead, look at gig-based jobs like Uber and Air-BNB.  While they might not offer the steady income of a regular-hours job, you can scale your work up or down depending on need and availability. Plus, if you don’t feel like working on a given day, you don’t have to.  With Air-BNB, the owners of a rental property can cancel for any reason with as little as 24 hours notice.  That’s the kind of fantastic option that’s not available if you have renters who are playing their music a little too loud above you. 
Turn your hobby into a gig.  If you want another way to generate income, one that doesn’t require you to do mindless tasks, and you want to keep enjoying your hobby, then it might be time to turn that hobby into a gig.  Do you scrapbook or make crafts?  Open a store on Etsy.  Are you an avid collector? Start investing and re-selling collectibles on eBay.  Do you build or tinker? Time for a workshop. Have a design? Put together a working prototype and take to Kickstarter.  Want to write a novel?  Fifty Shades of Grey and The Martian both started life as fan-made, self-published ebooks. It’s never been easier to find an audience or customer base.
If you’re looking to make the move from weekend warrior to someone who can make money with your passion, get some start-up capital. You’ll need workshop space, supplies or a new laptop.  We’ve got a lot of ways for you to invest in yourself.  Who knows, that investment could be the start of a new path to leaving the rat race behind. 
The goal is financial security, not paying off a single bill. There’s no prize in paying off your mortgage. It’s just one less bill to pay.  Your goal is overall financial security.  That could mean refinancing your mortgage to have cash in hand when interest rates are low, or investing significantly when interest rates are high.  So, don’t pay off your mortgage while racking up credit card debt or neglecting your student loans.  Instead, take a look at all of your debt.  Work from the highest interest rate to the lowest, paying off each in turn, so you can pay as little interest as possible every month.
One of the easiest ways to do this is with a home equity loan.  Using the equity you have built in your home will get you a lower rate than your credit cards or medical bills are charging, and it can even be a fixed rate, so you can benefit if the Federal Reserve raises interest rates.  All you need to do is secure a home equity loan then transfer your credit card balances onto the loan.  Sometimes, simply calling the credit card companies with a check from your home equity loan in hand will get them to drop the rate you’re being charged.  Fantastic! Now you can use your loan on a different card.
Whatever you do, you’ve got to be happy.  It’s difficult to find balance, particularly with debt and obligations hanging over our heads. The solution isn’t to take on more obligations and retreat from humanity. The solution needs to be understanding that money exists as a means to an end, not an end itself. 
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Passive Income And Rental Properties

Investing can feel pretty distant.  It’s hard to imagine the tiny fraction of Disney or Google that you own, your savings accounts can look a lot like a bunch of numbers with no meaning and mutual funds are about as easy to conceptualize as advanced trigonometry that’s taught in the original Greek. That’s why a big part of building a savings plan you can stick to begins with finding one you understand.  Passive income is one such simple concept. It is a valuable addition to your wealth-building strategy because it can put cash in your hand every month while also being tied to something tangible, like real estate.

Through passive income, you can develop a variety of ways to get paid every month with little or no day-to-day effort on your part.  One of the most traditional ways to generate this kind of income is to own a rental property, because you then receive a rent check every month while only needing to occasionally call a maintenance professional or list the house for rent every couple of years.  The benefit is obvious – if the rent you charge is greater than the cost of the mortgage, insurance and incidentals, you’ll earn a profit every month.  It might not be a large amount of money, but you’ll build equity along the way, and you can always sell the house at some point down the road.  

If you’re young and trying to figure out a retirement plan, owning a rental property can be fantastic because you’ll earn a few bucks every month, which will eventually turn into a larger payday on a regular basis when you pay off the mortgage. If you plan it right, this can be right around when you retire so you have retirement income without having to sell any stocks or liquidate any accounts. Also, if you ever hit a rough patch or need to raise cash for another investment opportunity, you can sell the house.  If you’re looking to get a great rate for a rental property, you can even use the equity you’ve got in your current house with a home equity loan, locking in a fixed rate while mortgage prices are at historic lows.


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The Government’s $3 Trillion Dollar Plan


So, whatever happened to that interest rate hike?  It was supposed to happen all spring, then all summer, and now we’re supposed to be fully confident that the Federal Reserve is going to raise interest rates by the end of 2015.  But so far, it hasn’t.  On one hand, that’s great news: You still have time to lock in a fixed-rate mortgage or take out a low, fixed-rate home equity loan to pay off those credit cards before the rates go up. By the way, if you’re interested, that’s only a click away.  

On the other hand, it’s a little worrisome.  Raising the prime interest rate is how the Fed tells us that the economy is doing well and it’s time to save money.  So, why haven’t we seen an interest rate hike? The answer is more interesting than you might think, because it involves a multinational chain of events and a $3 trillion gamble with your tax dollars on an interesting new idea. It’s an idea that falls somewhere between efficiently practical and boringly immoral, just as many decisions often are when they’re made by folks who have spent too much time staring at spreadsheets and not enough time breathing fresh air.

To explain what’s going on, we need to flash back six years.  At the height of the financial crisis, the two biggest concerns for the long-term future of the American economy were the resiliency of the big banks and the incredible number of home foreclosures.  If the banks couldn’t get their balance sheets straight, they couldn’t loan money, which would mean that anyone who wanted to buy a home, start a business, or go to college would suddenly find themselves without a loan to do so. Meanwhile, those on the brink of foreclosure, trying to keep their businesses afloat or finishing their education might lose everything they’d worked to acquire.  Of particular concern to the government were American homes, because our homes represent the largest part of our wealth, are essential to our well-being and buoy our retirement accounts.  Unfortunately, investment products built on inadvisable home loans were the centerpiece of the financial crisis, making the protection of our mortgages a difficult task.

The government’s solution was to bail out the banks, but to do so in a way that we hadn’t tried before.  Normally, the Fed puts money into the economy by buying government bonds from banks by using money it creates on a computer in its offices.  Fed managers tap on their keyboards, change a few spreadsheets, and poof, money is created.  In the aftermath of the financial crisis, however, they decided to create money by buying mortgage bonds, which made it easier for government money to flow to beleaguered homeowners, thereby protecting Wall Street and Main Street at the same time.  

However, the Fed can’t just create money without enduring some repercussions. Usually, it has to either remove the money from the economy over time, which can slow down an economic recovery, or watch as inflation eats away at the value of the dollar, causing people to dip into their savings and work harder for less actual pay. Neither option is fantastic.
This time, the repercussions could be even worse.  Because the Fed has tied the $3 trillion it created over the last six years to mortgage bonds, removing the money could cause a spike in mortgage rates. After all, that $3 trillion has been paying part of your mortgage for the last six years; that’s a profit for your lender that’s been passed on to you.  If the Fed chose to remove the $3 trillion and raise interest rates, we could see a spike in mortgage rates that all but guarantees young people will rent their homes for their whole lives.  If you were planning on selling your house in time for retirement, it could cripple the value of your home, because the same buyer who had $250,000 wouldn’t have more money, but they would have to pay more to their lender.  Not fantastic.

All year, the Fed has been staring down this crisis, warning us that it would have to raise rates, all the time hoping that doing so wouldn’t kill the housing market. Then, a really odd set of circumstances kept it from having to do so.  Twin financial crises in Europe and China drove international investors to the dollar. As they sought to sell other currencies, they propped up the value of the dollar, delaying the effects of inflation and buying the Fed more time.  

Now, a new plan has emerged, which is where a really interesting idea comes into play.  What if the Fed didn’t take the money out? Instead, it’s started paying the banks to keep savings with Washington, just like your savings account (except thousands of times larger).  The idea is that, as long as inflation is being kept under control through foreign investment, our central bank can pay about $30 billion a year in interest for financial institutions to store money. That money makes the banks want to save, which takes money out of the economy, which they pass on to some customers in the form of higher savings rates and making them want to save as well. Suddenly, the money has come out of the economy, inflation isn’t a risk, and everyone along the way is getting paid for doing so, especially big banks and their shareholders.  

Reminder: that’s your $30 billion per year.  Another reminder:  $30 billion was the budget request to keep Pell grants in line with inflation … over the next 10 years.  You’re paying the mega-banks 10 times what you’re paying to keep college funding from shrinking.

It’s a short-term solution, obviously.  Voters don’t love their tax dollars being spent to reward the same banks that caused the financial crisis, and those banks, by definition, are the ones being let off the hook.  Europe and China won’t buy dollars forever, particularly if it doesn’t look like the Fed is raising rates (which would help foreign investors who are saving their greenbacks).  At some point, the money is coming out of the economy.  Ten years from now, the Fed says, it will all be gone.  The only question is, how fast it will come out, which means we’re still waiting to hear when the prime interest rate is going up.

And that brings us back to today.  We’ve been told to expect a rate hike by the end of the year, and when it comes, it’ll cost you more to pay off your credit cards.  If you’re in a variable rate mortgage, your monthly payment will eventually go up.  The best move today is the simplest one, which is transferring over to fixed-rate loans.  Do it today, so you can save thousands of dollars.  Then, once you’ve locked in your rate, let your congressperson know that you don’t love your tax dollars continuing to bail out the mega-banks six years later.  

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