Should I Lend Out My Credit Card? 

Q: Some of my friends keep asking to borrow my credit card and I’m wondering if this iswoman with credit card a good idea. Should I be lending out my credit card?

A: While circumstances vary, lending out your credit card to friends and family is generally not a recommended practice.

Here are six reasons to say no when a friend, partner or family member asks to use your credit card:

  1. You’re making yourself vulnerable to fraud

While it is not against the law to lend out your card, you are likely breaking the rules of your credit card contract by doing so. Worse, you’re opening yourself up to unprotected fraud.

Federal law puts the cap on credit card holders’ liability for fraudulent charges at $50. In addition, many credit cards offer extra protection against fraud to keep you covered; however, none of these laws and stipulations apply if you’ve willingly lent out your card and fraud ensued. If your friend lost your card, was irresponsible with keeping its information secure or was simply in the wrong place at the wrong time and your card was hacked through no fault of their own, you’ll have to bear the brunt of that fraud. Even a zero-liability policy will not protect you if you’ve performed an act of “gross negligence”-which includes lending out your card.

  1. It can hurt your credit score

If your friend, partner or family member is asking to use your credit card for a purchase, there’s a good chance their own credit is shot. If your credit is still in good shape, why risk hurting your score by allowing someone who has proven to be an irresponsible spender to use your card?

  1. You’ll enable bad habits

The borrower is likely in the position of needing to borrow a card because of a reckless lifestyle and a buildup of irresponsible habits. You might think you’re being a good friend by helping them out in their time of need when, in reality, you’re only enabling them to continue on their path of self-destruction. You’ll be a truly good friend by showing some tough love and saying no.

  1. Payback time trouble

What happens when it’s time to pay that credit card bill and it’s a lot bigger than usual thanks to your friend’s spending spree? You might chase after your friend, asking for payment, only to have them respond by claiming you only need to pay the minimum payment right now, so they don’t need to pay it all back now. They may argue that you need to make that payment each month regardless of their spending, conveniently forgetting or playing dumb to the fact that interest is accruing on their purchase until it’s paid off.

This can go on for months as they continue procrastinating. They’ll reassure you that they haven’t forgotten the loan-they’re only waiting to land that dream job, get that raise they’ve been chasing or win the lottery. But until that happens, you’re left holding the bag.

It gets even stickier. Your friend may not understand that spending money on a credit card can mean paying back a lot more than the actual cost of the purchase. A prolonged balance on a credit card collects cumulative interest. Who’s responsible for paying that interest, you or your friend? While it’s your card, your interest expenses can increase a lot due to the large outstanding balance created by your friend.

However, if your friend believes they’ve only borrowed the amount they used to make their purchases, you’ll essentially be paying for the privilege of lending money.

  1. You’re putting your relationship in jeopardy

If you value your relationship with the person asking to use your credit card, you’ll turn down their request. By agreeing to let them use your card, you’re taking the risk of putting an unpaid loan between you and this person in position to ruin the relationship you share. You’ll feel awkward asking your friend to repay the loan yet again, and your friend may avoid your company when you’ve asked to be repaid one time too many. Why ruin a valuable relationship over a request you should have refused?

  1. You’re opening yourself up to repeat requests

Once you’ve gone down the road of lending out your credit card, it’ll be difficult to retrace your steps and learn how to say no. The original borrower may make a habit out of asking you to lend out your card, and other friends or family members who’ve heard about the arrangement may ask you to grant them the same privilege. Be strong and firm the first time you’re asked to lend out your credit card and you’ll better avoid facing the uncomfortable predicament of needing to turn down family and friends.

Your credit cards are personal objects marked with your own name. When friends, partners or family members ask to borrow your cards, just say no!

Your Turn: Do you think there’s ever a time to lend out a credit card? Share your thoughts with us in the comments.

SOURCES:
https://www.moneycrashers.com/why-you-should-not-lend-money-to-friends-and-family/

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/this-is-why-you-should-never-lend-someone-your-credit-card-2018-03-10
https://www.creditcards.com/credit-card-news/sandberg-lending-credit-card-relative-responsible-1377.php

5 Ways To Pay Off A Loan Early

If you’re like most Americans, you owe money toward a large loan. Whether that meanscouple working on computer carrying thousands of dollars in credit card debt, having a hefty mortgage in your name or making car loan payments each month, loan debt is part of your life. This means you’re looking at hundreds of dollars in interest payments over the life of the loan(s). There’s also the mental load of knowing you owe perhaps tens of thousands of dollars and that you’ll be paying back the loan for years to come.

It can all get kind of depressing-but it doesn’t have to be that way.

Did you know there are simple, but brilliant, tricks you can employ to lighten the load? With a carefully applied technique, you can pay off your mortgage, auto loan, credit card debt and any other debt you’re carrying quicker than you thought possible. These tricks won’t hurt your finances in any dramatic way, but they can make a big difference to the total interest you’ll pay over the life of the loan and help you become debt-free faster.

You can free up more of your money each month, use your hard-earned cash for the things you want instead of forking it over in interest and live completely debt-free sooner than you’d dreamed. It’s all possible!

A note of caution before we explore these tricks: Check with your lender before employing any approach, as some loan types have penalties for making extra or early payments (we don’t at Destinations Credit Union!).

1. Make bi-weekly payments

Instead of making monthly payments toward your loan, submit half-payments every two weeks.

The benefits to this approach are two-fold:

  • Your payments will be applied more often, so less interest can accrue.
  • You’ll make 26 half-payments each year, which translates into an extra full payment on the year, thereby shortening the life of the loan by several months or even years. If you choose this method with a 30-year mortgage, you can shorten it to 26 years!

2. Round up your monthly payments

Round up your monthly payments to the nearest $50 for an effortless way to shorten your loan. For example, if your auto loan costs you $220 each month, bring that number up to $250. The difference is too small to make a tangible dent in your budget, but large enough to knock a few months off the life of your loan and save you a significant amount in interest.

For a potentially even bigger impact, consider bumping up your payments to the nearest $100.

3. Make one extra payment each year

If the thought of bi-weekly payments seems daunting but you like the idea of making an additional payment each year, you can accomplish the same goal by committing to just one extra payment a year. This way, you’ll only feel the squeeze once a year and you’ll still shorten the life of your loan by several months, or even years. Use a work bonus, tax refund, or another windfall to make that once-a-year payment.

Another easy way to make that extra payment is to spread it out throughout the year. Divide your monthly payment by 12 and then add that cost to your monthly payments all year long. You’ll be making a full extra payment over the course of the year while hardly feeling the pinch.

4. Refinance

One of the best ways to pay off your loan early is to refinance. If interest rates have dropped since you took out your loan or your credit has improved dramatically, this can be a smart choice for you. Contact Destinations Credit Union to ask about refinancing.

It’s important to note that refinancing makes the most sense if it can help you pay down the loan sooner. You can accomplish this by shortening the life of the loan, an option you may be able to afford easily with your lower interest rate. Another means to the same goal is keeping the life of your loan unchanged and with your lower monthly payments, employing one of the methods mentioned above to shorten the overall life of your loan.

5. Boost your income and put all extra money toward the loan

A great way to cut the life of your loan is to work on earning more money with the intention of making extra payments on your loan. Consider selling stuff on Amazon or eBay, cutting your impulse purchases and putting saved money toward your loan, or taking on a side hustle on weekends or holidays for extra cash. Even a job that nets you an extra $200 a month can make a big difference in your loan.

Triumph over your loans by using one or more of these tricks to make them shorter and pay less interest. You deserve to keep more of your money!

Your Turn: Have you used any of these methods or a different approach for paying off a loan early? Tell us about it in the comments.

SOURCES:
https://www.thebalance.com/how-to-pay-off-debt-early-315571

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.huffpost.com/entry/top-6-ways-to-pay-off-any-loan-faster_b_1624242/amp
https://www.payoff.com/life/money/6-ways-to-pay-off-your-car-loan-early/